Sore Eyes

 

What is it?

Many factors in your everyday lifestyle and environment can irritate your eyes, making them feel sore and uncomfortable.

What are the main causes?

  • Staring at a computer screen for long periods can cause eye strain which in turn can lead to sore eyes.
  • Lack of sleep - When we are tired our eyes can feel sore.
  • Pollution - exhaust fumes, smoke, dust and chemicals can irritate the eyes making them feel sore
  • Swimming - The chlorine used in swimming pools can be particularly irritating to your eyes
  • Age - As we get older our eyes become more sensitive to irritants as the eye's natural protective and repairing processes start to slow down.
  • Glare and bright lights force the eyes to strain in order to protect them from the light, which can in turn make the eyes feel sore.

What are the symptoms?

Sore eyes often look normal but sometimes you'll also notice signs of redness. Your eyes will probably feel gritty & itchy and may also be slightly watery. Both eyes are usually affected.

What can I do about it?

Optrex Eye Drops provides relief to sore, irritated and red inflamed eyes. 

Top Tips:

  • Try and get plenty of sleep by avoiding repeated late nights
  • When driving long distances take a break at least every 2 hours
  • Take regular breaks from your computer screen - look away from it at least every 5 minutes and focus on something further away.
  • Avoid glare from computers by reducing screen brightness or using a screen shield.
  • Wear goggles when swimming to stop chlorine irritating the eyes.

Want to know more?

Find out more about Optrex Eye Drops here

Not Sure? Click here to use our solution finder and find out what Optrex product may be most suitable for your needs.

Always read the label. Use only as directed. If symptoms persist, see your healthcare professional.

Optrex Medicated Eye Drops

Always read the label. Use only as directed. If symptoms persist, see your healthcare professional.
*Dry, irritated, watery and tired symptoms due to disturbed lipid layer of the tear film, approximately 80% of dry eye cases.
Dausch D et al. Klin Monatsbl Augenheilkd 2006: 223: 974-983

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